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Your Perfect Lawn
your perfect lawn
Hundreds of easy to follow ideas, tips and shortcuts to create the perfect lawn. This is the book that will cover EVERYTHING you need to know about creating the lawn of your dreams. Order Now
Do you know that simple effective and natural means exist to get rid of moles?

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Aero Grow - Aero Garden
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Enjoy fresh greens at every meal no matter what the season. With AeroGrow's AeroGarden garden kit, it's easy to cultivate lettuce, cherry tomatoes, herbs, chili peppers, edible flowers, and more in an energy efficient, organic based environment right in the kitchen. Plug kits for many kinds of plants are available. No dirt or natural light is needed, so even low light spaces are suitable. More...
Tree Help
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Starting trees from seed can be one of the most rewarding gardening activities More

The Art of Gardening

Most things, in the course of development, change from the simple to the complex. The art of gardening has in many ways been an exception to the rule. The methods of culture used for many crops are more simple than those in vogue a generation ago. 

The last twenty years has seen also a tremendous advance in the varieties of vegetables, and the strange thing is that in many instances the new and better sorts are more easily and quickly grown than those they have replaced. The newer sorts are not only larger and better, but hardier and earlier; and the new forms have made them more generally available.

Knowledge on the subject of gardening is also more widely diffused than ever before, and the science of photography, videos, internet etc., has helped wonderfully in telling the novice how to do things. It has also lent an impetus and furnished an inspiration which words alone could never have done. If one were to attempt to read all the gardening instructions and suggestions being published lately, he would have no time left to practice gardening at all. 

Q: Why then, the reader may ask at this point, another garden guide or book?
It is a pertinent question, and it is right that an answer be expected in advance. The reason is this: while there are many garden books on the market, most of them pay more attention to the "content" than to the form in which it is laid before the prospective gardener. The material is often presented as an accumulation of detail, instead of by a systematic and constructive plan which will take the reader step by step through the work to be done, and make clear constantly both the principles and the practice of garden making and management, and at the same time avoid every digression unnecessary from the practical point of view. Some other guides or books again, are either so elementary as to be of little use where gardening is done without gloves, or too elaborate, however accurate and worthy in other respects, for an every-day working manual. We feel, therefore, that there is a distinct field for the present guide.

Using A Guide Like This

And, while we still have the reader on this gardening buttonhole, we want to make a suggestion or two about using a guide like this. Do not, on the one hand, read it through and then put it away in some folder with the old email, and trust your memory for the instruction it may give; do not, on the other hand, wait until you think it is time to plant a thing, and then go and look it up. For instance, do not, about the middle of May, begin investigating how many onion seeds to put in a hill; you will find out that they should have been put in, in drills, six weeks before. 

Bookmark and read the whole guide through carefully at your first opportunity, make a list of the things you should do for your own vegetable garden, and put opposite them the proper dates for your own vicinity and than print that information. Keep this available, as a working guide, and refer to special matters as you get to them.

Do not feel discouraged that you cannot be promised immediate success at the start. We know from personal experience and from the experience of others that "guide-gardening" is a practical thing. If you do your work carefully and thoroughly, you may be confident that a very great measure of success will reward the efforts of your first garden season.

And we know too, that you will find it the most entrancing game you ever played.

Good luck to you!
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